WRITING

I’m an occasional contributor to a few print and online publications. My work has appeared in WIRED, XLR8R, Bust, GOOD, Twitch, Resident Advisor, and TIME, among others. I’m mostly interested in music (electronic, hip-hop), architecture + design (modern, mid-century), film (world cinema, animation), and eastern European politics and culture.

CAN A SLUMCHELLA MUSIC FEST EMPOWER KENYA’S POOR? (GOOD)
Over the next two weekends, hundreds of thousands of music fans will flock to the palm tree-lined fields of the California desert for Coachella, one of the most popular music festivals in the world. Meanwhile, thousands of miles away in Kenya, a California-based nonprofit collective of artists-activists known as Village Beat is working to produce their own large-scale musical fest—one that borrows Coachella’s framework of unity through music—to protest Ethiopia’s largest infrastructure project to date, the Gilgel Gibe III dam.
BREAKING THROUGH: JONWAYNE (RESIDENT ADVISOR)

Meet Jonwayne, a baby-faced white kid from the LA suburb of La Habra, who’s been a fixture at Low End Theory long before he was old enough to drink. The 21 year-old rapper/producer got his start early, writing his first raps and recording his first beats while still in high school. Back then, he was a football-playing poetry-writing theater geek. Now, the LA beatmaker and rapper is endorsed by both the Low End Theory and Stones Throw crew.

USING QR CODES TO PRESERVE IDENTITY (WIRED)
Quick Response (QR) codes, those little black-and-white boxes of pixels that encode links and information, are popping up everywhere these days. Taking advantage of the codes’ ability to capture and obscure data, Los Angeles-based Chilean artist Guillermo Bert has found another creative use of QR technology — he’s using the barcodes to preserve the identity and traditions of the Mapuche, Chile’s largest indigenous population.
REWIND: DJ SHADOW, XLR8R
There are endless treasures in DJ Shadow’s deep discography. The legendary turntablist first struck gold with his 1996 full-length debut,
Endtroducing….., an all-sample album that continues to inspire nearly two decades after its release. Since then, Shadow (a.k.a. Josh Davis) has released several more acclaimed records, as well as a couple of collections of lost gems, and has worked with everyone from Cut Chemist to Little Dragon to Talib Kweli. Ahead of his headlining performance at Decibel and the release of his new best-of collection, he took us on a trip through his lengthy, wide-ranging back catalog, starting with his early singles for London-based label Mo’ Wax, all the way through his recent archival projects.
MUSIC CAN THE MAGNETIC FIELDS’ NEW ALBUM RECAPTURE THAT 69 LOVE SONGS MAGIC? – TIME
Thirteen years ago, The Magnetic Fields released their 69 Love Songs, a colossal three-disc collection exploring the vast complexities of love that was largely hailed as a synth-pop masterpiece. For any other band, such an ambitious undertaking can — and probably should — be dismissed as a gimmick, but due to the mercurial talents of band leader Stephin Merritt, The Magnetic Fields unquestionably pulled it off, and since then, fans have pined for another record as brilliant as 69 Love Songs. But is that too much to ask? Is there life after the landmark album?
L.A. THE WILTERN OPENED 80 YEARS AGO, ITS SURVIVAL STORY IS AS GRAND AS ITS TERRA-COTTA TILE (L.A. WEEKLY) Less than a year old and wearing red tennis shoes, I took the first steps of my life at the Wiltern. My mother had brought me to visit my father, an architect, in his office on the second floor of the Pellissier office tower, overlooking the art deco theater’s neon marquee. Twenty-two years later, I recently returned to the Wiltern on the 80th anniversary of its grand opening. A green terra-cotta wonder in an urban sea, it remains enchanting.

SPARKS PREMIERE RADIO DRAMA “THE SEDUCTION OF INGMAR BERGMAN” LIVE AT L.A. FILM FEST SATURDAY, GUY MADDIN DIRECTS THE “FILM-TO-BE” PERFORMANCE (L.A. WEEKLY)
L.A.’s own veteran pop duo Sparks, brothers Ron and Russell Mael, bring the world premiere of a staged version of their latest project, a radio drama called The Seduction of Ingmar Bergman, to the Los Angeles Film Festival Saturday night.

THE FANTASTIC AND FREAKY FILMS OF SION SONO (KPCC 89.3)
Japanese cult writer-director Sion Sono started out as prolific poet until he took up filmmaking. He earned worldwide critical acclaim for his film “Love Exposure” — a four-hour epic that tackles life’s biggest issues: love, death, sex, revenge, religion and up-skirt panty photography. His latest is “Cold Fish,” which screens at Cinefamily on Aug. 6 and 7. It’s a tale of a tropical fish salesman who’s drawn into the dark orbit of a charismatic, middle-aged serial killer, based on a true story. He talked with Off-Ramp’s Lainna Fader on his last trip to L.A.

DETROIT PUNK BAND DEATH’S FIRST LA SHOW (KPCC 89.3)
In the early 1970s, the music of Detroit was split into two scenes: the black soul, funk and R&B of Motown and the white rock ‘n’ roll of MC5, The Stooges, Alice Cooper, and Bob Seger Somewhere in the middle was Death, brothers David, Bobby, and Dannis Hackney, who put out punk music years before anyone else was playing punk on the east side of Detroit. Off-Ramp’s Lainna Fader talked with Death’s singer and bassist Bobby Hackney from his home in Vermont.
LAUREL NAKADATE: TORN APART BY THINGS SHE CAN’T SEE (OBEY)
Laurel Nakadate is known for doing things she probably shouldn’t be doing, in places she probably shouldn’t be—like holding dance parties in strange men’s apartments, photographing herself dangling pairs of underwear out of the windows of Amtrak trains, and waking up sleeping girls and telling them to undress. She documents these encounters in videos and on film as she explores themes of voyeurism, loneliness, and connecting to others through, within, and outside of the camera.